Thursday, September 29, 2016

BackdoorSurvival.com Features Without Land!

BackdoorSurvival.com Prepper Book Festival
In 2014 when I launched my first novel Day After Disaster, I began wondering what credible survival
sites featured non-fiction books and would do me the honor of featuring my new creation. I found BackdoorSurvival.com by searching the top 10 survival sites. Upon contacting BackdoorSurvival.com I was pleased to be invited to participate in the "Prepper Book Festival" and I was thrilled to add BackdoorSurvival.com as a stop on my Virtual Book Tour.

BackdoorSurvival.com is produced by a woman with an outstanding attention to detail, a thirst for prepper and survival knowledge, and extensive experience in applying what she preaches in her own life. Her name is Gaye and she created BackdoorSurvival.com with the goal to share her angst and concern about the deteriorating economy and how it will effect our normal everyday lives. She also wanted to become a prepper of the highest caliper. All of her vast information on BackdoorSurvival.com is free and she assures us that it will remain that way indefinitely. Gaye assures us that we will never find "ripped-off" content or pictures on her site. She produces original content and tests the information in her own preps. Gaye reminds us that it is our responsibility to go out and find what is right for us but she gives her opinion on many topics in an attempt to help us gather information and sort out the details.

BackdoorSurvival.com has a ton of preparedness information on just about every topic imaginable and as I mentioned before, Gaye practices what she preaches so you can gather real world information on how that idea worked out for her. This website also features crafty DIY projects that will teach you how to make your own preps and survival items, plus save money while you are at it. Gaye is very knowledgeable about essential oils and offers some great deals to get yourself stocked up at a discounted rate. BackdoorSurvival.com also has the top 10 Amazon Most Wished for Prepper and Survival Kit items to help you get your survival kit prepared. If you are just starting out on the prepper journey, Gaye has outlined a 12 Months of Prepping Guide to help you stay lazer focused on the essentials and keep your budget inline with those essential goals.

As I mentioned in the beginning, BackdoorSurvival.com also features yearly book festivals. Gaye personally reviews each book featured in the festival and gives her opinion whether the book is worth your investment or not. The festival features both fiction and non-fiction books that focus on survival and prepping. It is a great event to follow and keep your brain entertained and educated as you go. I was honored when Gaye asked me if she could feature my newest book, Without Land as an addition to this year's book festival. I agreed and I will be giving away a couple of copies of both of my books as part of this celebration.

I give BackdoorSurvival.com five stars but don't just take my word for it, here's what others say:

"Gaye, I found you through your guest post on Alt Market, Nine Healing Herbs You Can Grow At Home. Great info here! Wanted to say thank you and let you know that I’m adding you to my links on my site. Take care." -Survival Sherpa

"Hi there Gaye, I’ve been enjoying your site a lot lately. There is SO much great material and you have done a great job putting it together with outstanding content. Thanks so much for the contributions to the survival community." -Billy.
 
"Gaye, I’m truly impressed with the online resource you’ve created here. My first glimpse of prepping came from watching reality TV, at which point I wasn’t much of a believer. But I also read a great deal of economic news from sites like zerohedge.com. It’s become more and more clear to me that the skills you’re compiling on your site are things that we all are going to need in the not too distant future. Thank you for the time and effort you put into this. It’s truly appreciated" -Jason

Tuesday, September 27, 2016

Healing Power of Story Telling

Episode 63: Season 2 ep. 28




The Without Land continues: Cole questions Erika relentlessly about her past and how she survived the disaster. Erika hates reliving her history each time she tells the story. Here to discuss how creating, telling and listening to stories can have a healing effect is Kelvin Kwa, author of Apex Predator


"This is life. Like it or not, this is it. We can go on living or give up, and I, sir, will never give up."

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Lessons from Kelvin

Kelvin drew his inspiration for writing his story from a desire to digest a certain type of information. He loves sci-fi stories and was looking for a specific type of story. When he did not find it, he started writing his own story about a sea monster and the military activity surrounding this creature.

Kelvin explains that there are many emotional benefits to creating a story. There is a certain personal satisfaction in the story's creation and a therapeutic experience to reading and writing. Kelvin, like myself, even enjoys reading his own work and often feels amazed that he wrote it. Also as an author it gives you a chance to live vicariously through the reactions of your readers. It is extremely gratifying when your audience loves your work.

Kelvin is not sure of specific medical research that would validate his findings but his experience, having been married to a physiologist, is that it is hard to change someone's outlook on life or "what's in their heart" by explaining facts and figures to that individual. What you can do is share your stories or stories of others and how other individuals have healed after having a similar experience. Your story is your testimony to facts and how you were affected by them. The story doesn't have to be about you. As fiction writers or story tellers, the creator can make a character similar to a hurt individual that the hurt individual can connect emotionally to and invest into. Once they make this investment, the reader sees themselves as characters, or heroes and they can take the steps with the hero to heal with the character. "We are each one of us the heroes in our own story," in the telling and listening of our own story.

It is important to tell your story and understand those of others. Before writing his book, Kelvin wasn't sure if he could tackle such a feat. He often looked at others and wondered how it was possible. But even the longest journey starts with a single step. Even if your story doesn't make sense, keep writing. Put yourself in a place where the story forms itself and your brain can work comfortably. Don't give up!

Women's Self Defense


Kelvin Kwa

Kelvin Kwa is a Microsoft certified professional with a diploma in computing and applied physics. His love of technology, mythology and fantasy has led to years of collecting and reading. Kwa is a husband and a father living near Melbourne, Australia. “Apex Predator” is his first book.
Sara F. Hathaway
Sara F. Hathaway is the author of the The Changing Earth Series: Day After Disaster and Without Land. She also hosts The Changing Earth Podcast which blends her fictional stories with educational survival tips. Sara grew up in the country where she developed a profound interest in the natural world around her. After graduating with honors from The California State University of Sacramento with a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, she launched into a career in business management. In her fictional novels her research and experience with survival techniques and forgotten life-sustaining methods of the generations past come to the forefront in a action packed adventures. She has used her background in business management to pave new roads for fictional authors to follow and she delights in helping other achieve the same success. She currently lives with her husband and two sons in California where she is at work on the sequel to her first two novels. For more information and a free copy of “The Go-Bag Essentials” featuring everything you need to have to leave your home in a disaster visit: www.authorsarafhathaway.com
Purchase Without Land
Purchase Day After Disaster


 

Friday, September 23, 2016

Survival Secrets from The Big Woods: Tree Trunk Smokehouse

Survival Secrets from The Big Woods: Tree Trunk Smokehouse

I opened up a book I haven't read for quite a while: The Little House in The Big Woods by Laura Ingalls Wilder. I have always loved these stories but I hadn't read them in a long time. My son is now five and we read to him every night. He is able to stay engaged with a longer chapter book so I blew the dust off this old goodie and began to read. 

Although I have read this book many times, I  know so much more about traditional survival skills now that I found myself enthralled with each lesson Laura teaches us throughout the pages of this book. Not only was I thrilled to be sharing traditional American values with my son but I wanted to take notes on everything Laura was describing.

The first survival skill that Laura describes is the story of her Pa hunting deer in the fall. Anyone who is a hunter knows that the deer season doesn't open until the fall but have you ever thought about why the season at this time? Besides the fact that the bucks are so horny they turn into crazy idiots that are easier to kill, Laura explains that the deer are fattest at that time, which absolutely makes sense. Also, all of the babies are grown so if you do take a doe, the baby should no longer be relying upon mama.

Pa would hang the deer that he killed high up in the trees so that they were not eaten by wolves or bears. After hanging, the deer would be carefully skinned and the meat would be cut, sprinkled with salt and laid on a board. Then Pa would use a tall length of hollow tree trunk and put nails in it from either end as far as he could reach. He would stand it upright and put a roof over the top and a little door in the bottom that had leather hinges. 

After the meat had been salted several days a hole was put in the end of each piece with a string through it. Then, it was hung on the nails inside the log. A fire was built inside the little door with tiny bits of bark, moss and green hickory chips to make a smoldering, smokey fire. The fire was fed for several days and when the smoke died down, more chips were added. After several days each piece was wrapped in paper and hung in the attic or place where they would be safe and dry.

I have lots of meat stored in freezers and I am constantly on the lookout for ways I can preserve the meat if we could no longer use our freezers. This sounds like a fairly easy way of preserving meat so I had to find out more. I referenced this information by my go-to source for traditional survival skills: Back to Basics, How to Learn and Enjoy Traditional American Skills by Reader's Digest.  I found out that Pa was right on.

Pa was correct for hunting in the fall when the temperature outside is lower. Meat decays rapidly above forty degrees. In order to hang your meat the temperature must be maintained between forty degrees and freezing, which tends to occur in the fall. Back to Basics encourages a very clean environment when packing meat for good reason and recommends a very sharp carbon fiber blade to work with. 

When Ma "salted" the meat she was actually curing the meat. This must be done first to preserve the meat properly. Salt is the only essential curing element. Meat treated with just salt will store well but be tough and dry. Many times sugar or honey is added along with herbs but you have to be careful what herbs you add, some can have an overwhelming flavor. Pickling salt is the best salt to use and table salt is not recommended. 

There are two curing methods: Dry curing and brine curing. Dry curing is what Laura's ma did. When dry curing you pack the meat directly in salt and seasoning, making sure to pack extra seasoning in nooks and crannies and around bones. You cover the bottom of a curing box with your rub, layer meat on it, add another seasoning layer and then more meat, until the box is full. In three days you should remove the meat and re-coat with seasoning. Pack it back into the box and repeat this process every five days. 

Brine curing tends to produce a product that is moister than dry curing. The curing mixture is dissolved in water. Always boil questionable water before use. Then lay the meat on the bottom of a watertight container that is not-metal. You fill it with brine until your pieces of meat begin to shift. Then cover the meat with a plate or a weight so it doesn't float up to the top. Try to remove all air bubbles from your brine. After five days, remove the meat, spoon off scum, stir brine and repack. To check, Back to Basics, recommends cutting off a piece and tasting it. When the meat is cured, rinse in warm water, then cold, and scrub off any clumped salt. Then hang it in a warm place to dry.

Back to Basics explains that there are two types of smokehouses: A hot smoke house and a cold smoke house. The distance between the smoke chamber and the fire differentiates the two. When the fire is further away it is a cold smoke house and a cold smoke house tends to do better with long term preservation. Although the distance in Laura's story is not that far, it is still my belief that the tree trunk is a type of cold smoke house because the fire has to be smaller so the log does not burn. 

Any smoke house is going to need ventilation to keep the smoke fresh. For long term storage the temperature inside should be seventy degrees Fahrenheit to 90 degrees Fahrenheit. Back to Basics displays the design for an easy to construct cold smoker. 




















In this example a fire pit is dug a foot lower than the smoking chamber and 10 feet away from the smoking chamber. The fire pit should have a lid to trap the smoke and be located on the side from which the prevailing winds blow. A stovepipe or tile lined tunnel connect the fire pit to the smoking chamber. The smoking chamber can be as simple as a wooden box with a removable lid. The meat is hung inside the box. Do not use soft woods when smoking. It is best to use hickory, apple, or cherry. Damp chips should be added to a bed of coals to create the ideal smoke. 

Now I am on the hunt for a good piece of stovepipe. Then I can begin experimenting with this intriguing process. Just goes to show how sometimes fiction can be a fact teacher.

Tuesday, September 20, 2016

Flooding: How to Prepare and Stay Safe

Episode 62: Season 2 ep27

In this chapter of Without Land, the team witnesses a devastating flood. In our current world it seems as if we are hearing about mass flooding events more and more. Here to talk to us today about flooding: what you can do to prepare for it and how you can stay safe during the even is Ken Jensen, producer of TheCleverSurvivalist.com and host of The Prepper Podcast.



Featured Quote:

"Time has a funny effect on memories: boring parts get deleted and exciting parts get dramatized for the listener."
Flood Lessons from Ken

There are many ways to prepare yourself, your home and your belongings before a flood happens to you. First of all, do not move to a flood zone if you can avoid doing so. If you live in a flood zone or are forced to move there get flood insurance. Look at the plan carefully and make sure you understand the fine details about the coverage. Then take inventory of your home. Take pictures and document everything you own: household appliances, electronics, jewelry, artwork, clothing, everything! Put this documentation in a secure cloud storage or on a remote server. This way you can retrieve the documents from another location. Alternatively, you can store them in a waterproof, fireproof safe.

There are some easy steps you can take to prepare your home. If you have a basement make certain
you have a sump pump and a battery operated back up sump pump. Install a water alarm into your basement. Keep your gutters clean. If you don't clean them regularly water will go where you don't want it to go. Ensure that all of your electrical is 12" above the projected flood plane. Install back flow valves in piping. Know how to turn off all of your utilities in the event of a flood. Have sandbags and thick plastic sheeting ready to use. Lining your sandbags with this plastic sheeting will improve their ability to keep water at bay. When sandbagging focus on doorways, windows and anywhere water can easily flow into your home. You can also use the sandbags to deflect the flow of water from your home.

When flooding occurs you have to know when to leave. in 2015, 155 people died from flooding. That's more than most other natural disaster death statistics. The reason is people are not leaving when told to do so. Have one go-bag per person and drinking water stored in jugs to avoid contamination. Have first aid kits on hand and your maps in waterproof sheeting. Know your evacuation routes and practice them often. You have to know these routes very well because the floods may remove signs and landmarks. Know your emergency numbers and call a loved one in a different geographical location before you leave. U.S. topographic maps and google elevation maps will help you find what routes exist at higher elevations.

You bug out vehicle should be ready for flood conditions as well. Include emergency life vests in the vehicle. Have an emergency SOS beacon and an amateur radio available. You should also include a device that will break your window. Sometimes the head rest build into your car is equipped for window breaking and also certain tactical flashlights are made to break car window glass.

When traveling water poses a dangerous threat. Less than two feet of moving water can sweep your car away. The water gets in-between the tire and the road and then the side pressure moves your car wherever it want to. Even big trucks are challenged to move across moving water so don't just assume that because your truck is a monster you are going to make it. When walking you need to learn good techniques to do so, less than six inches of water can take your legs out from under you. Use proper river crossing techniques to traverse the water and you can use your walking stick to judge depth as you go.

Here are some tips to get out safely. Number one listen to the radio and watch the news. Pay attention to the weather alerts. They can be annoying but don't tune them out because it could be the difference between life and death. Number two, make any last minute evacuation preparations. Number three, fill your sandbags and build leak reduction barriers with thick plastic. Number four, elevate important things as high as possible. Number five, if you have a flash flood warning (not a watch) get out immediately. If you wait too long it may be too late. Stay out of the flood water, often times it is very toxic.

Know 3 destinations to go to in 3 different directions. Know 3 routes to get to each destination and have 3 rest stops along the way where you can meet up with any group members who get split up during the evacuation.
Ken Jensen

Ken Jensen is an American, Ex-Military Patriot that is knowledgeable and experienced in Electronics and Industrial Electrical design and maintenance. Ken is also an experienced Nuclear Reactor Operator and also worked on nuclear instrumentation. He grew up hunting, camping and spending time outdoors. In adulthood, Ken has spent many years learning wilderness survival and, eventually, urban survival.

Ken is the author of a book, The Honey and The Bee and is the main author and contributor to The Clever Survivalist Blog, Survival Guide and The Prepper Podcast, Survival Podcast

Links:
Sara F. Hathaway
Sara F. Hathaway is the author of the The Changing Earth Series: Day After Disaster and Without Land. She also hosts The Changing Earth Podcast which blends her fictional stories with educational survival tips. Sara grew up in the country where she developed a profound interest in the natural world around her. After graduating with honors from The California State University of Sacramento with a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, she launched into a career in business management. In her fictional novels her research and experience with survival techniques and forgotten life-sustaining methods of the generations past come to the forefront in a action packed adventures. She has used her background in business management to pave new roads for fictional authors to follow and she delights in helping other achieve the same success. She currently lives with her husband and two sons in California where she is at work on the sequel to her first two novels. For more information and a free copy of “The Go-Bag Essentials” featuring everything you need to have to leave your home in a disaster visit: www.authorsarafhathaway.com
Purchase Without Land
Purchase Day After Disaster


 

Survival Gear: Essential EDC Item!

I don't normally take a moment to tell you about specific survival gear. There are a ton of companies out there making great products and not so good products. If you need a certain product to feel a gap in your survival preparations, you can do your homework and pick an item that is going to be best for your individual needs. My goal is to educate your brain not fill your house with stuff.

However, there is a company that has come onto the survival scene with some great products that I can firmly stand behind. They call themselves Wazoo Survival Gear and they are making quality products that maximize the usefulness of things that we wear everyday already! I found out about Wazoo because I was researching paracord bracelets and how people are innovating and taking products to the next lever. I found Wazoo's website and was blown away by the advanced amount of gear they were packing into one little bracelet. Check this out:

All these handy survival items
 In one pretty cool looking bracelet


I have followed Wazoo Survival Gear because I am a minimalist. I would rather carry as little as possible on my person but I never want to leave without my everyday carry items. Wazoo is thinking up some great ideas to do just that and now they are introducing a brand new product:

The Cache Belt. 

The Cache Belt puts the original "money belt to shame." Instead of a tiny pocket that you can only get things into and out of when the belt is off, you can pack The Cache Belt's two foot long pocket full of every day carry items. It's ability to be accessed from the top of the belt keeps everything handy and it's rugged Velcro ensures that nothing is coming out. By utilizing the space provided by this belt you can save space in your go-bag to pack full of other essentials.Wazoo is packing this belt full of essential survival items and for the amount of gear you are getting in an easy to carry everyday item, the price point is spot on.

In the fairness of giving this product a proper review I also need to mention any of the areas of the belt that I felt might be cumbersome or need improvement. Anyone who has worn a money belt, carried extra gear strapped to them or stuffed pockets of gear to the brim knows that when the belt is full of gear it may look and feel a little clunky strapped around your waist. Depending on the situation, this discomfort or attractiveness might be very much worth the extra carry space gained. The only other shortcoming that I could possibly think of is, although I love black, it is the only color, so far, that the belt is available in.

The Cache Belt is a piece of survival gear that is an absolute must have. Why would you not want an easy to access pouch to hold all those little items that can easily get lost in any pack. The Nylon webbing is a quality fabric that will ensure that this belt will be with you for the long haul.

Get on over there and check The Cache Belt out!
www.WazooSurvivalGear.com














Sara F. Hathaway
Sara F. Hathaway is the author of the The Changing Earth Series: Day After Disaster and Without Land. She also hosts The Changing Earth Podcast which blends her fictional stories with educational survival tips. Sara grew up in the country where she developed a profound interest in the natural world around her. After graduating with honors from The California State University of Sacramento with a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, she launched into a career in business management. In her fictional novels her research and experience with survival techniques and forgotten life-sustaining methods of the generations past come to the forefront in a action packed adventures. She has used her background in business management to pave new roads for fictional authors to follow and she delights in helping other achieve the same success. She currently lives with her husband and two sons in California where she is at work on the sequel to her first two novels. For more information and a free copy of “The Go-Bag Essentials” featuring everything you need to have to leave your home in a disaster visit: www.authorsarafhathaway.com
Purchase Without Land
Purchase Day After Disaster


 

Tuesday, September 13, 2016

Fabric: What Types Store, How to Prepare It, How to Store It




Sara F. Hathaway
Author Sara F. Hathaway is an individual with an insatiable urge for learning. She grew up in the woods of Michigan, fishing, hunting, gardening, canning, and horseback riding with her family. She loved to learn about the stories of times past from her great grandparents and grandparents. She learned about a time much different from our own when a trip to the grocery store was not all it took to make sure your family was fed. She delighted in the outdoors and learning how to survive there without the trappings of modern life.

After moving to the rural mountain landscape of California, she attended The California State University of Sacramento and graduated with a bachelor’s degree in General Business Management. She managed many businesses, all while working on the manuscript for her fictional novel, Day After Disaster. Eventually she realized that her passion for the outdoors and learning about survival techniques outweighed her passion for the business world. She took her marketing skills and applied them to launching a successful platform for her first novel, Day After Disaster and its sequel, Without Land.

Sara still lives in Northern California with her husband and two sons where she is at work on The Changing Earth Series. She delights in helping other authors find the same marketing success and enjoys her time that she gets to spend honing her survival skills while teaching these skills to her sons. For more information and a free copy of “The Go-Bag Essentials” featuring everything you need to have to leave your home in a disaster visit: www.authorsarafhathaway.com
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Purchase Day After Disaster


 

Tuesday, September 6, 2016

Traditional Farming, After Global Oil Collapse

Find this podcast:

Sara F. Hathaway
Sara F. Hathaway is the author of the The Changing Earth Series: Day After Disaster and Without Land. She also hosts The Changing Earth Podcast which blends her fictional stories with educational survival tips. Sara grew up in the country where she developed a profound interest in the natural world around her. After graduating with honors from The California State University of Sacramento with a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, she launched into a career in business management. In her fictional novels her research and experience with survival techniques and forgotten life-sustaining methods of the generations past come to the forefront in a action packed adventures. She has used her background in business management to pave new roads for fictional authors to follow and she delights in helping other achieve the same success. She currently lives with her husband and two sons in California where she is at work on the sequel to her first two novels. For more information and a free copy of “The Go-Bag Essentials” featuring everything you need to have to leave your home in a disaster visit: www.authorsarafhathaway.com
Purchase Without Land
Purchase Day After Disaster