Tuesday, April 25, 2017

Survival Story: The Tyrant Series


Episode 93: Season 3 ep. 12

In this chapter of The Walls of Freedom, Daniel's condition worsen as the family continues their mission to find help for the small boy. As the survival journey becomes an ever greater struggle, author L. Douglas Hogan joins us to discuss the survival story he created in The Tyrant Series.

Featured Quote:

“We have to go now. The darkness won't cover us forever."

Survival Lessons from The Tyrant Series

The Tyrant Series consists of three novels, The Rise, Main Core, and Endgame. As well as, a collection of five short stories, Tori's Journey, and a novelette, Acts of Defiance. The plot features a group of southern Illinois men and women in a world where the Constitution of the United States of America has been thrown out the window and martial law has taken over. Doug describes a time after "the flip" when martial law took over and the UN appeared on the scene.
The Mississippi River was used as an entry point to the United States by UN insurgence forces. Survival and extreme persecution become their lifestyle and they have to fight back to save their country. The United States is controlled by "the district" or the DC area. They are in control of all the natural resources due to executive orders that were truly put into law by Kennedy and Obama. The citizens start to accumulate to a bigger fighting force to restore liberty.
Doug creates real world characters in his books. Nathan is the main group leader. Denny is his best friend. Jess is a strong female character who enters the book and Tori is another female character that takes charge of her own survival. Tori received a big response from fans, prompting L. Douglas Hogan to create her own book of short stories featuring Tori. His characters are sometimes named after real people but their character nuances may vary from real life. 
L. Douglas Hogan likes to write organically and lets the story create itself. In the beginning Jess's story is the one that leads you into the world of the main characters. He considers the randomness of real life and includes this intense drama in his writings. He is not afraid to remove any character at any time if it adds emotional value to the adventure.
There are some practical lessons taught in the The Tyrant Series. The first thing is you need to be familiar with your survival equipment and weapons systems.  You need to be comfortable with them when you need to rely on them. Think of survival scenarios that you can place yourself in and consider what you would do to survive. These scenarios will help you avoid anxiety and have a game plan when disaster strikes. Know your communications systems. Being cut off from the rest of the world when you are desperate for information, is not a good idea. Survivors will need to connect for long-term survival.
L. Douglas Hogan also wants readers to take away some important messages from his fictional work. He wants the citizens of the United States to stay aware of the growing globalist agenda and the threat that poses to our country. He also wants readers to remember that liberty isn't free. We need to stay vigilant and protect the Constitution because it is under constant assault. Watch the news and hear both sides. Know the agendas behind the propaganda. He leaves us with the importance of being prepared. Have a group of people who have the skills you need to survive.

Similar to Morphine: The Best Natural Painkiller that Grows in Your Backyard

L. Douglas Hogan

L. Douglas Hogan is a U.S.M.C. veteran with over twenty years in public service. Among these are three years as an anti-tank infantryman, one year as a Marine Corps Marksmanship Instructor, ten years as a part-time police officer, and seventeen years working in state government doing security work and supervision. He is the best-selling author of “Oath Takers”, has authored four books in a series titled Tyrant, and is working on the sixth a final book of the series. He has been married over twenty years, has two children, and is faithful to his church, where he resides in southern Illinois.

Links:
Sara F. Hathaway
Sara F. Hathaway is the author of the The Changing Earth Series: Day After Disaster and Without Land. She also hosts The Changing Earth Podcast which blends her fictional stories with educational survival tips. Sara grew up in the country where she developed a profound interest in the natural world around her. After graduating with honors from The California State University of Sacramento with a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, she launched into a career in business management. In her fictional novels her research and experience with survival techniques and forgotten life-sustaining methods of the generations past come to the forefront in a action packed adventures. She has used her background in business management to pave new roads for fictional authors to follow and she delights in helping other achieve the same success. She currently lives with her husband and two sons in California where she is at work on the sequel to her first two novels. For more information and a free copy of “The Go-Bag Essentials” featuring everything you need to have to leave your home in a disaster visit: www.authorsarafhathaway.com

 

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Traversing Mountain Landscape

Episode 92: Season 3 ep11

In this chapter of The Walls of Freedom, the group continues their journey across the mountain terrain with one very sick little boy. Here to talk to us today about traversing some of the obstacles that mountain terrain presents, is Ken Jensen, producer of TheCleverSurvivalist.com and host of The Prepper Podcast.


Featured Quote:

"Huge pines loomed above them and the gray rocks of the Sierra Nevada Mountains welcomed her home."
Lessons about Traversing Mountain Landscapes from Ken

Water Obstacles
The method to get across water depends on the type of water you are crossing. There are some general concerns. One of them is being swept away in the current. You are putting yourself in harms way to traverse this obstacle. You may get hypothermia from being in the water. Believe it or not shallow water runs faster than deep water but most of the top we don't give shallow water as much respect.

The first thing you need to do is get to high ground, climb a tree if you have to. Then find an appropriate place to cross. You want to cross on low ground. A place with several channels is better than a wide part of the river. Try to find an area that is up river from a calm area with shallow areas where you will have a chance to catch your footing.

Look out for obstacles on the other side of the river as well. Make sure you will be able to climb up
where you cross. When you look across remember that you will be traveling at a forty five degree angle. Also, make sure you are not upstream from rapids or a waterfall.

Choose a spot in the river free of rocks, indicated by white cap water. Avoid estuaries or areas where smaller water enters larger water. Usually silt will gather there and the river will be wider. You also want to avoid eddies where the water is swirling. Usually this indicates there is a large obstacle in the water.

Crossing the Water
If you are crossing a deep, swift river, swim with the river. Keep your body positioned horizontally and try to stay on top of the water. This way you are less likely to get pulled down or hit an obstacle below the water.

If the river is fast and shallow, lie on your back with your feet pointed down river. Use your hands at your sides like fins.

If you encounter very deep water with rapids lie on your stomach with you head forward and aimed for shore. This will allow you to maintain control while crossing.

When crossing a swift, treacherous stream that is about waste high, remove all your clothing except your shoes. This will decrease drag. Use your walking stick or a pole that is about as tall as you, and push it into the water upstream from yourself. It will help to break the current. Also putting downward pressure on the pole give you better footing. Take small, slow steps, moving the pole forward at a forty five degree angle.

If you have to cross a river with a big group but no rope, you can interlock arms. Put the strongest person out front and they will help to break the current for the weaker folks who cross later.

When crossing a river with an injured person, you will have to take additional safety measures. The first option is the rope option. Send out your strongest person tied off to a rope that is three times the length of the river. Hook it around a tree on the side of the river and feed slack to the person crossing. Tie off the rope on the other side of the river. If you have a carabiner or a rigger's belt you can tie off to the rope for additional security.

Alternately you can build a raft. Ken describes building a raft out of your poncho. You can put sticks and debris in it with saplings in an x and another poncho on top. I had never heard of this method before and my curiosity was peaked. I found this video at ddhammocks.com   

 

Repelling a Cliff Without Gear 
An essential skill for traveling in the mountains is the ability to read a map. You should know your map well. You should always use the proper gear for repelling if you can. At the very least you should have a tactical belt that is also a rigger's belt. This belt is made for emergency repelling. 
Set two anchor points close together. Usually commercial buildings will have anchor points for window cleaning and maintenance. If you do not have an anchor use a natural feature that will hold five thousand pounds of weight like a big tree.

If you have gear you can use a figure eight or ATC to make your repel easier. Here are a couple of links so you can see what these climbing tools are:
Fore safety tie a stopper knot at the end of the rope and tie a couple more further up.

It turns out that explaining how to do an emergency repel is very hard to do with only audio so linking you to videos is the easiest way to show you some of the methods for bringing down injured individuals. Ideally you should have two people belaying the rope and two people guiding the stretcher. You should tie off with a figure eight knot and a stopper knot. If you do not have a stretcher you can use a full body harness to lower them down.
Ken Jensen

Ken Jensen is an American, Ex-Military Patriot that is knowledgeable and experienced in Electronics and Industrial Electrical design and maintenance. Ken is also an experienced Nuclear Reactor Operator and also worked on nuclear instrumentation. He grew up hunting, camping and spending time outdoors. In adulthood, Ken has spent many years learning wilderness survival and, eventually, urban survival.

Ken is the author of a book, The Honey and The Bee and is the main author and contributor to The Clever Survivalist Blog, Survival Guide and The Prepper Podcast, Survival Podcast

Links:
Sara F. Hathaway
Sara F. Hathaway is the author of the The Changing Earth Series: Day After Disaster and Without Land. She also hosts The Changing Earth Podcast which blends her fictional stories with educational survival tips. Sara grew up in the country where she developed a profound interest in the natural world around her. After graduating with honors from The California State University of Sacramento with a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, she launched into a career in business management. In her fictional novels her research and experience with survival techniques and forgotten life-sustaining methods of the generations past come to the forefront in a action packed adventures. She has used her background in business management to pave new roads for fictional authors to follow and she delights in helping other achieve the same success. She currently lives with her husband and two sons in California where she is at work on the sequel to her first two novels. For more information and a free copy of “The Go-Bag Essentials” featuring everything you need to have to leave your home in a disaster visit: www.authorsarafhathaway.com
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Tuesday, April 11, 2017

WWII Lessons to Remember an Interview with Leon Malmed





Leon Malmed



"My parents were born in Poland. They immigrated to France in 1931 to get away from the programs, the anti-Semitism, the hatred of the general population and from a bleak life with no future. They married shortly after their arrival in France. For 11 years they lived a happy in Compiègne, a town of about 20,000 people, 45 miles north of Paris.  My father was a tailor and my mother a seamstress.  My sister Rachel was born in 1932 and myself in 1937.

WWII was declared on September 3rd of 1939. Though, our father was still a Polish citizen, he immediately enlisted in the French army and was sent to the front. France surrendered three weeks after the beginning of the hostilities. All soldiers caught in uniform were taken prisoner. They spent the next 5 years in German prison camps. Our father who was able to change in civilian clothes escaped and rejoined us.

July 19, 1942 at 5AM, two French policemen knocked at the door of our apartment and asked our parents to follow them to the Police station. No reason is given.  “What about our children?” our parents ask hysterically. Our parents were still Polish citizen. My sister and I were French citizens having been borne if France.  The commotion wakes up our neighbors, the Ribouleau family, from the floor below. They quickly come up the flight of stairs to see what the noise is all about.  Monsieur Ribouleau, our 2nd floor neighbor, we hardly knew, said: “Mr. and Mrs. Malmed, do not worry, we will take care of your children until you return”.  
These few words saved our lives.

Years later we found our parents were sent to Drancy and then to Auschwitz.  Our mother either died in transport and or was gassed on arrival.  His father was alive in 1944 but no other clue as to what happened to him. For two years we lived with the Ribouleau family.  This couple put their lives and the lives of their two sons, René, 20 and Marcel, 17, in mortal danger.  We escaped roundups and endured many hardships.  When the war was over I was almost 8 years old." -Leon Malmed

Links:
Sara F. Hathaway
Sara F. Hathaway is the author of the The Changing Earth Series: Day After Disaster and Without Land. She also hosts The Changing Earth Podcast which blends her fictional stories with educational survival tips. Sara grew up in the country where she developed a profound interest in the natural world around her. After graduating with honors from The California State University of Sacramento with a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, she launched into a career in business management. In her fictional novels her research and experience with survival techniques and forgotten life-sustaining methods of the generations past come to the forefront in a action packed adventures. She has used her background in business management to pave new roads for fictional authors to follow and she delights in helping other achieve the same success. She currently lives with her husband and two sons in California where she is at work on the sequel to her first two novels. For more information and a free copy of “The Go-Bag Essentials” featuring everything you need to have to leave your home in a disaster visit: www.authorsarafhathaway.com

 

Tuesday, April 4, 2017

Herbal Answers to Everyday Ailments

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 Sara F. Hathaway
Sara F. Hathaway is the author of the The Changing Earth Series: Day After Disaster and Without Land. She also hosts The Changing Earth Podcast which blends her fictional stories with educational survival tips. Sara grew up in the country where she developed a profound interest in the natural world around her. After graduating with honors from The California State University of Sacramento with a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, she launched into a career in business management. In her fictional novels her research and experience with survival techniques and forgotten life-sustaining methods of the generations past come to the forefront in a action packed adventures. She has used her background in business management to pave new roads for fictional authors to follow and she delights in helping other achieve the same success. She currently lives with her husband and two sons in California where she is at work on the sequel to her first two novels. For more information and a free copy of “The Go-Bag Essentials” featuring everything you need to have to leave your home in a disaster visit: www.authorsarafhathaway.com

 

Saturday, April 1, 2017

April Survival Fact and Fiction Features



Hey guys! It's time for some new features from Survival Fact & Fiction. I'm hearing crickets on our Facebook page. Get over there and leave your thoughts on this months features: Facebook page  This month we have a riveting read from Scott Nicholson, After the Shock. David E. Crossley's Personal Survival Kit. Plus we are featuring a great survival site with a ton of information to keep you learning. As always, I encourage you to spread the word about our stellar authors and content providers! (If you are on Twitter use #SFFBC) 

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